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Regional Wasteshed Coalition

Larimer County Landfill
 

After more than 50 years of service the Larimer County Landfill is almost at the end of its useful life – it is forecast to reach capacity and close by 2024.

The City of Fort Collins has been working closely with regional partners to develop a master plan for the long-term future of waste disposal and resource recovery infrastructure in Northern Colorado. After several years of careful analysis and stakeholder input, the following facilities are now being proposed:

  • Transfer station for Trash
  • Recycling Center Upgrades
  • Construction & Demolition Debris Sorting
  • Yard Waste Composting
  • Food Waste Composting
  • New Landfill

Continue exploring this page to learn about all about these exciting new plans!

FAQs


What is a Wasteshed?

waste·shed

ˈwāstəˌSHedˈ

noun

1. An area that shares common rules and means for handling waste.

The term "wasteshed" is used to describe an area where waste, much like water or air, does not adhere to normal boundaries. The regional wasteshed of Colorado's North Front Range is an area in and around Larimer County, including all solid waste generated by residents and businesses from the cities, towns, and unincorporated areas.


Regional Wasteshed Coalition Master Plan

The Larimer County Landfill is forecast to reach capacity and stop accepting waste in 2024. The process to design, permit, and construct new facilities can take years, so a final decision on what should replace the current landfill must be made now to allow enough time for new facilities to be built.

Unprecedented regional collaboration for solid waste planning, spurred by the Larimer County Landfill nearing capacity, has yielded a master plan for infrastructure that can divert significant waste from landfills without capital investment from the City of Fort Collins. To support this project, the role of municipalities in the region is to adopt specific policies that will deliver materials to the new County-owned resource recovery facilities.

View the Plan


Landfilled Waste from Fort Collins 2016

 

Throughout Fort Collins valuable resources are currently being buried in landfills, as shown in the figure to the left and in the 2017 Waste & Recycling Report. To help meet community diversion goals and serve the region for decades to come new facilities are outlined in the new master plan, The proposed facilities are projected to divert as much as 40% of what is currently landfilled, delivering useable products back into the regional economy.  


What is Being Proposed?

Significant new infrastructure is planned including resource recovery facilities for green waste and construction debris, a convenient trash drop-off site for residents and trash haulers, upgrades to the existing recycling center, and a new landfill in the north part of the county – all without using taxpayer funding!


Transfer Center (Trash)

Convenient trash drop-off for both residents and trash haulers in separate traffic lines.

Recycling

Improvements to the existing facility that handles mixed recycling

Construction and Demolition Debris Processing

A covered facility that sorts out mixed loads of materials from building sites (such as wood, metal, and concrete, etc.).

Yard Waste Composting

Windrow composting system that turns yard trimmings (leaves, branches, grass, etc.) into a valuable soil amendment (compost).

Food Waste Composting

An enclosed composting system that turns food scraps into a valuable soil amendment (compost).

New Landfill

A modern sanitary landfill for containing garbage.


All proposed facilities, except the new landfill, would form a new resource recovery center just south of the existing landfill complex (near S. Taft Hill Road & W. Trilby Road). Larimer County will continue to host recycling and household hazardous waste drop-off at the new resource recovery center. A modern, sanitary landfill would be built on a section of County-owned land in northern Larimer County.


Map of proposed resource recovery facility, located just south of the existing landfill complex (near S. Taft Hill Road & W. Trilby Road).

Supportive Policy

The proposed Regional Wasteshed Coalition Master Plan calls for new policies and programs to be implemented in Fort Collins and Larimer County. These policies will help drive material to the proposed County-owned facilities and help ensure that they are financially viable.


Flow Control for Construction and Demolition Debris (C&D)

All mixed loads of construction and demolition debris must be sent to a County-owned processing facility for a period of ten years (projects over 1,000sf).

Flow Control for Single-Stream Recyclables

Mixed curbside recycling must be sent to a County-owned recycling center.

Yard Trimmings and Food Scraps Diversion

Municipalities would be expected to develop policies and programs appropriate for their community to divert green waste from landfills.

Planning Process

Logos for Larimer County, City of Fort Collins, City of Loveland, and Estes Park
 

The Regional Wasteshed Coalition is made up of staff and elected representatives from Fort Collins, Loveland, Estes Park, and Larimer County. Throughout a rigorous, multi-year planning process, the Coalition worked with stakeholders and the public to research and propose new facilities to construct and open before the County landfill closes.


The planning process included extensive analysis of:

  • Current and future regional solid waste volumes
  • Emerging technologies for resource recovery
  • Recommended infrastructure components
    • Including triple-bottom line and market impacts
  • Policies to support new facilities

Eleven possible solid waste infrastructure options were identified for analysis and narrowed down to the five new facilities recommended based on cost-benefit ratio, timeframe to complete, and projected tipping fees.

Public Engagement

The Coalition worked closely with stakeholders and members of the public in developing the proposed Master Plan.

  • A Stakeholder Advisory Group met seven times between May 2017 and September 2018 to provide input and review technical and policy information produced by coalition staff.
    • Over 50 stakeholders were invited to participate from key sectors including: the business community, academia, regional governments, waste haulers and recyclers, boards and commissions, state agencies, and advocacy groups.
  • Coalition staff met directly with local waste haulers throughout the project to discuss impacts on their operations.
  • Staff engaged with numerous boards and community groups, and they provided feedback throughout the project.
  • Four open houses were held in May of 2018 throughout the County to educate the public about the topic and seek feedback on proposals.

Next Steps

If directed by Fort Collins City Council, a resolution of support for proposed facilities will be developed for consideration at a regular meeting in January 2019. An intergovernmental agreement formalizing the needed commitments by the Wasteshed jurisdictions will be developed for review at a work session in February of 2019. Implementation of the master plan, including design, permitting, and construction of new facilities would begin in 2019.


How to Get Involved

Fort Collins Residents can get involved in the Regional Wasteshed Planning Process by:


FAQs

Why are new solid waste facilities being proposed now?

The Larimer County Landfill is forecast to reach capacity and stop accepting waste materials in 2024. The process to design, permit, and construct new facilities can take years so a final decision on what should replace it must be made in 2019 to allow enough time.


What is a Wasteshed?

The term "Wasteshed" is used to describe an area where waste, much like water or air, does not adhere to normal boundaries. The regional Wasteshed of Colorado's North Front Range is an area in and around Larimer County, including all solid waste generated by residents and businesses from the cities, towns, and unincorporated areas.


What Facilities are Being Proposed?
  • Transfer Station – Convenient trash drop-off for both residents and trash haulers in separate traffic lines.
  • Recycling Center (Upgrades) – Improvements to the existing facility that handles mixed recycling.
  • Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris Sorting – A covered facility that sorts out mixed loads of materials from building sites (such as wood, metal, and concrete, etc.).
  • Yard Waste Composting – Windrow composting system that turns yard trimmings (leaves, branches, grass, etc.) into a valuable soil amendment (compost).
  • Food Waste Composting – An enclosed composting system that turns food scraps into a valuable soil amendment (compost).
  • New Landfill – A modern sanitary landfill for containing garbagw.

How were these new facilities chosen?

Over the last several years a coalition of regional governments has conducted rigorous analysis, with input from key stakeholders and the community.


How much waste material could be diverted from landfilling if these new facilities are built?

It is estimated that as much as 40% of the materials currently being sent to landfills could be diverted by the proposed resource recovery facilities.


Would the County use my tax dollars to build these new facilities?

No. The approximately $60 million needed for new facilities would come from existing funds and financing managed by the Larimer County Solid Waste Department. Future revenue needed to operate them will be generated by user fees.


How would the proposed changes affect my trash bill?

Because waste haulers set their own rates for collection services in Fort Collins there is no way of knowing precisely. Research indicates an average monthly cost increase of less than 10% for trash collection service. This is because disposal costs are only a small part of the costs to haul waste materials.


Are new rules needed for waste handling and disposal in this proposal?

Yes, under the proposed changes yard waste would be banned from disposal in the waste stream. Yard waste is so readily recyclable into valuable new products (compost and mulch) that it has no place in landfills. This rule will drive more materials to local private and public facilities able to process green waste. Fort Collins’ City Code currently includes waste bans for cardboard and electronic waste.

 

In addition, haulers would be required to take single-stream recycling and mixed construction and demolition debris to the proposed new resource recovery center – a policy known as flow control which would not apply to trash.


Why require flow control for certain materials?

Flow control ensures there’s enough material coming into a facility to make it financially viable and to spur future investment. Landfill disposal fees are expected to be approximately 20% lower than recycling fees so market forces alone won’t drive recyclable materials to resource recovery facilities.


Would the new facilities be operated by Larimer County staff?

Still to be determined. Public-private partnerships may be established for facility operation.


Would I have to drive my trash thatâs too big for curbside pickup to a new landfill north of Wellington?

No. The new resource recovery center proposed just south of the existing landfill (at Trilby and South Taft Hill roads) would include a transfer station for trash, so residents can continue to dispose of materials at this familiar location right between Fort Collins and Loveland.


What current services would remain?

Larimer County will continue to host recycling and household hazardous waste drop-off at the new resource recovery center near the existing landfill complex. The recycling center will undergo upgrades and continue to process single-stream recycling. Convenient trash drop-off at a state-of-the art transfer station will be easily accessible to visitors as well as drop off for green waste and construction materials.