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Carnegie Center for Creativity

 Contact Information

Visual Arts Administrator
For information:
  •   Wed-Sat noon-6 p.m., Extended hours (6-9 p.m.) on First Friday Gallery Walks

 Visual Arts Newsletters

About the Carnegie Center for Creativity

The Carnegie Center for Creativity (Carnegie) at the Historic Carnegie Building is owned and operated by the City of Fort Collins. The Carnegie is home to public gallery, classroom, and meeting spaces that are available to rent for exhibition, performance, teaching and event purposes. The Carnegie is intended to be used by artists from various disciplines, employing a wide range of artistic expressions. The Carnegie is also home to the Downtown Fort Collins Creative District and Fort Collins Public Media.

Pianos About Town Open House

Pianos About Town Open House
 

If you are interested in painting a piano as part of Pianos About Town in 2020, come to our informational sessions to learn more about the process:

Session I: Presentation and Q&A
Jan. 9, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Carnegie Center for Creativity, 200 Mathews St., Fort Collins

This session will include a presentation at 6:30 p.m. about the application and review process. Handouts will be provided, and program staff will be available to answer questions during the rest of the session.

Session II: Open House and Application Review
Jan. 23, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Carnegie Center for Creativity, 200 Mathews St., Fort Collins

At this drop-in session, staff will be available to sit with applicants one-on-one to review applications and make application recommendations. Staff also will be available to provide general information for applicants who were unable to attend the first information session. Information about other artist opportunities offered by the City of Fort Collins will be available.

Call for Entries

Alistair Dunnington, February 5-8, Gallery B

Alistair Dunnington, February 5-8, Gallery B
 

Alistair Dunnington has been adding to a series that can be described as abstracted figures. A series where he depicts the classic human portrait in an obscured manner to express the illusion between seeing and detailing an observation. The body of work displayed contains the most recent works done with this style in mind. Most figures are shown in a stagnant pose similar to one of an old photograph, creating a sense of reflection for the audience to look into how they view others.

Photos