Skip to main content

News

Press Releases

Bloomberg Awards Fort Collins $100,000 to Make Lower-Income Rental Households Efficient

Released on Wednesday, February 21, 2018
Contact Information
Images
  • City of Fort Collins Image

Fort Collins is one of 35 Champion Cities selected from 320 applications as part of the 2018 U.S. Mayor’s Challenge, which provides grants and technical assistance to city leaders who are solving urgent problems in their communities, Bloomberg Philanthropies announced today.

Bloomberg awarded Fort Collins a $100,000 grant to develop a program that would improve the energy efficiency of low- to moderate-income rental households.

Fort Collins is one of 35 Champion Cities selected as part of the 2018 U.S. Mayor’s Challenge, which provides grants and technical assistance to city leaders who are solving urgent problems in their communities.

In Fort Collins, 46,704 low- to moderate-income residents live in inefficient housing that perpetuates health and economic disparities in the community. The City will spend the next three years developing public-private partnerships that help catalyze the renovation of thousands of single- and multi-family rental properties. The strategy includes helping people finance these energy improvements through their utility bills, known as on-bill financing.

Mayor Wade Troxell selected the theme of “Climate Economy” as the innovative idea for the Bloomberg competition. The Climate Economy refers to the notion that economic prosperity can occur without high carbon emissions.

“In Fort Collins, we are demonstrating that we can thrive as a community and lower our emissions,” Troxell said. “Everyone in our community deserves the chance to improve the energy efficiency in their homes for their wellbeing and the overall health of the community. We are honored to be recognized by Bloomberg as a community focused on reducing our energy usage and making those programs more accessible.”

Through partnerships, the City expects to generate $75.8 million in private-sector investment in the next decade, which will result in an average of 150 new energy-related jobs over the life of the project, said Sean Carpenter, Climate Economy Advisor for the City, who is managing the grant.

The 35 Champion Cities were judged on vision, potential for impact, implementation plan, and potential to spread to other cities. The selection committee included former Ambassador Caroline Kennedy and former Xerox Chairman & CEO Ursula Burns and distinguished policy experts, artists, academics, business executives and social innovation leaders.

“We received hundreds of bold and creative ideas from cities around the country in response to the 2018 Mayors Challenge, and these 35 really stood out for their potential to improve people’s lives. The next six months are a great opportunity for the cities to test their ideas and make them even more innovative and effective,” said Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies and Mayor of New York City.

Bloomberg Philanthropies works in over 120 countries around the world to ensure better, longer lives for the greatest number of people. The organization focuses on five key areas for creating lasting change: Arts, Education, Environment, Government Innovation, and Public Health. In 2016, Bloomberg Philanthropies distributed $600 million. For more information, go to http://www.bloomberg.org.