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Fort Collins Restorative Justice Services Referrals

This information applies to The Restorative Justice Conferencing Program (RJCP) and The RESTORE Program for shoplifting.

A young offender (age 10-17) may be referred to Restorative Justice Services from many areas:

click image to enlarge
pic Thinking first makes for better decisions is this youth's message.

In all cases there are three requirements for both programs:

  1. The offender takes responsibility for his actions.
  2. The (youth) offender's parent or guardian agrees to participate.
  3. The victim or victim representative agrees to participate in the conference.

First Steps

A summons has been issued and forwarded, or a police officer or school official refers the case directly to the program. It is not necessary that a summons be written. The incident is screened for appropriateness and a facilitator is selected.

click image to enlarge
pic One young shoplifter felt and showed the pain of her decision to steal.

Fort Collins Municipal Court

Fort Collins Municipal Court may refer cases to Restorative Justice Services. These cases are handled as a diversion from the court. When the young offender has completed the program, the results are reported back to the court.

District Attorney

The District Attorney's office may refer cases to Restorative Justice Services. These cases are handled as a diversion from the court. When the young offender has completed the program, the results are reported back to the court.

School Officials

Through the school resource officer (SRO), school officials may refer incidents to Restorative Justice Services, with or without a summons being written. The SRO should call the program director or case manager to assess the appropriateness of the incident.

Private Citizen

A private citizen may ask for restorative justice to be used, however the request must be made through the source responsible for referring the matter (i.e. police officer, district attorney's office, municipal court, etc.)

Failure to Complete RJCP or RESTORE

In all cases, if a young offender fails to complete the RJ Program and its requirements, the case is sent back to the referring party.

Types of charges that typically come to RJCP

  • Trespassing
  • Criminal Mischief (vandalism)
  • Theft (not shoplifting)
  • Harassment
  • Assault
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Fireworks, Fire-setting, Arson and other fire-related charges
  • Many other types of misdemeanor offenses.

Types of charges that come to RESTORE

  • Shoplifting (theft)

Types of charges not handled through Restorative Justice Services

  • Cases with offenders, 21 years and older.
  • Drug and alcohol charges, DUI
  • Smoking violations
  • Felonious charges such as: child abuse, violent crime, drug abuse.
  • Animal Control (barking dogs, animal at large, dangerous animal)
  • Divorce or child custody disputes
  • Discrimination complaints

Program Fee

Both programs charge a $50 program fee for each offender. A sliding scale is available for families who qualify.

Non-Discrimination

Restorative Justice does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability or age in the delivery of its services. Interpreter services and documents translated to other languages are available at no cost to Restorative Justice participants.

En la prestación de sus servicios, la Justicia Restaurativa no discrimina por razones de raza, color, origen nacional, religión, sexo, discapacidad o edad. Los servicios de intérpretes y traducción de documentos a otros idiomas están disponibles sin costo alguno para los participantes de la Justicia Restaurativa.